Young Geologist drawn like a magnet to Geoscience Australia

03 February 2006


Diane Jorgensen, from Townsville, is one of eight talented young graduates selected to partake in Geoscience Australia's 2006 graduate program.

Winning a place on Geoscience Australia's graduate program was amazing news for the Townsville local Diane Jorgensen. "The graduate program offers the perfect opportunity to learn as much as I can and I am really excited to be involved," Diane says. She was immediately attracted to the Geoscience Australia graduate program because it gave her a chance to work on a large range of her own projects.

The University of Queensland was where Diane first encountered geology, while undertaking a double degree in Arts and Science. She then completed her honours project in sedimentology, before going on to do her PhD on ancient coastal sand dunes of Western Australia, looking at climate changes over the last 125,000 years at James Cook University in Townsville.

Even with her commitment to Geoscience Australia, Diane maintains she will still find time for the other interests in her life, including going to the beach, swimming, hiking and collecting fridge magnets from all of the locations she has travelled to chasing her first love of geology.

The graduate program is a challenging process aimed at bringing young people into the organisation, integrating their new ideas, talents and knowledge and maintaining Geoscience Australia at the forefront of geoscience.

The program looks for graduates who are not only skilled within the field of geoscience, but who are committed to achieving results, motivated and thrive on new challenges., with each graduate being initially employed for a period of twelve months.

During their initial 12 month period of employment, the graduates have three or four rotations in the organisation's specialist divisions. "I'm really looking forward to the year ahead. I am doing a job I love," Diane says. "It does not get much better then that."

Topic contact: media@ga.gov.au Last updated: October 4, 2013