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Optical Sensors

Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS)ALOS
The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) provides high quality, low cost Earth observation data for topographical mapping, disaster and environmental monitoring, and climate change studies. No longer available from Geoscience Australia.

Resourcesat-1 Satellite (IRS-P6)RESOURCESAT-1 (IRS-P6)
The Resourcesat-1 (IRS-P6) satellite provides high quality Earth observation data for integrated land and water resources management purposes. No longer available from Geoscience Australia.

EO-1 satelliteEO-1
Products derived from the Hyperion and ALI sensors onboard the EO-1 satellite were available from Geoscience Australia through a special arrangement with the United States Geological Survey (USGS). No longer available from Geoscience Australia.

Radar Sensors

Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS)ALOS PALSAR
The Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) instrument is an active microwave sensor for cloud-free and day-and-night observation. No longer available from Geoscience Australia.

RADARSAT-1 satelliteRADARSAT-1
The RADARSAT-1 satellite was launched on 4 November 1995. It has a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensor onboard. This sensor can operate in a variety of imaging modes to suit a range of applications. Provides cloud-free and day-and-night observation. No longer available from Geoscience Australia.

ERS-1 satelliteERS
The first satellite in this series, Earth Resource Satellite (ERS-1) was launched on 17 July 1991. ERS-2 was launched on 20 April 1995. Provided cloud-free and day-and-night observation. ERS-1 mission ended on 10 March 2000, ERS-2 ceased operations July 2011. No longer available from Geoscience Australia.

JERS-1 satelliteJERS-1
The Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1 (JERS-1) was a joint project between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). JAXA was in charge of the satellite while MITI is responsible for the observation equipment. Cloud-free and day-and-night observation data were available. No longer available from Geoscience Australia.

Topic contact: earth.observation@ga.gov.au Last updated: August 9, 2012