JERS-1 - Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1

Introduction

JERS-1 is no longer available from Geoscience Australia. The Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1 (JERS-1) was a joint project between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). JAXA was in charge of the satellite while MITI is responsible for the observation equipment.

Historical Information

JERS-1 was launched in February 1992 and ceased operation on 11 October 1998, four years more than the original two year mission plan. It observed the Earth's surface using optical sensors and a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensor. The optical sensors collected information from eight spectral bands, while the SAR sensor operated in the L-band of the microwave wavelengths.

ACRES acquired JERS-1 SAR data at the Alice Springs ground station between September 1993 and October 1998.

Sensor Characteristics

Optical Data

Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR)

Band no. Spectral Range (µm) EM Region Generalised Application Details
1

0.52 - 0.60

visible green

Vegetation surveys, land use, water monitoring

2

0.63 - 0.69

visible red

Chlorophyll absorption for vegetation differentiation

3

0.76 - 0.86

near infrared

Biomass surveys (nadir viewing)

4

0.76 - 0.86

near infrared

Biomass surveys (forward looking, at 15.3 degrees, to give stereo coverage with band 3)

Short Wave Infrared (SWIR)

Band no. Spectral Range (µm) EM Region Generalised Application Details
5

1.60 - 1.71

middle infrared

Vegetation moisture

6

2.01 - 2.12

middle infrared

Hydrothermal mapping (eg. soils, geology)

7

2.13 - 2.25

middle infrared

Hydrothermal mapping (eg. soils, geology)

8

2.27 - 2.40

middle infrared

Hydrothermal mapping (eg. soils, geology)

Optical Data Characteristics (VNIR and SWIR)

Product Pixel Size

18 meters

Scene Size

75 km

Data quantisation

6 bits

Synthetic Aperture Radar Data 

The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensor is an active microwave sensor capable of imaging the Earth regardless of time of day, cloud, haze or smoke over an area. The instrument is classified as "active" as it emits the microwave energy necessary to image the Earth's surface. In contrast, 'passive' or 'optical' sensors rely on the Sun's reflected energy to image the Earth.

An important difference between ERS SAR, RADARSAT and JERS SAR is that the latter operates in L-band, while the former two operate in the C-band part of the spectrum, making JERS SAR data well suited to land based studies.

JERS SAR Characteristics

Frequency

1.3 GHz

Band Width

15 MHz

Band Name

L-Band

Wavelength

235 mm

Off Nadir Angle

35 degrees

Ground Resolution

18 meters

Swath Width

75 km

Polarisation

HH*

* H=horizontal.

Generalised Applications

Geology

Geological structural mapping

Forestry

Tree density, Forest-type mapping

Soils

Soil moisture studies

Agriculture

Crop type discrimination

Land Use

Surface feature discrimination

How to get JERS-1 imagery and data

Topic contact: earth.observation@ga.gov.au Last updated: August 20, 2012