Abstract

A 2-D crustal velocity model has been derived from a 1997 364 km north-south wide-angle seismic profile that passed from Ordovician volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks (Molong Volcanic Belt of the Macquarie Arc) in the north, across the Lachlan Transverse Zone into Ordovician turbidites and Early Devonian intrusive granitoids in the south. The Lachlan Transverse Zone is a proposed west-northwest to east-southeast structural feature in the Eastern Lachlan Orogen and is considered to be a possible early lithospheric feature controlling structural evolution in eastern Australia; its true nature, however, is still contentious. The velocity model highlights significant north to south lateral variations in subsurface crustal architecture in the upper and middle crust. In particular, a higher P-wave velocity (6.24-6.32 km/s) layer identified as metamorphosed arc rocks (sensu lato) in the upper crust under the arc at 5-15 km depth is juxtaposed against Ordovician craton-derived turbidites by an inferred south-dipping fault that marks the southern boundary of the Lachlan Transverse Zone. Near-surface P-wave velocities in the Lachlan Transverse Zone are markedly less than those along other parts of the profile and some of these may be attributed to mid-Miocene volcanic centres. In the middle and lower crust there are poorly defined velocity features that we infer to be related to the Lachlan Transverse Zone. The Moho depth increases from 37 km in the north to 47 km in the south, above an underlying upper mantle with a P-wave velocity of 8.19 km/s. Comparison with velocity layers in the Proterozoic Broken Hill Block supports the inferred presence of Cambrian oceanic mafic volcanics (or an accreted mafic volcanic terrane) as substrate to this part of the Eastern Lachlan Orogen. Overall, the seismic data indicate significant differences in crustal architecture between the northern and southern parts of the profile. The crustal-scale P-wave velocity differences are attributed to the different early crustal evolution processes north and south of the Lachlan Transverse Zone.
Google map showing geographic bounding box with values North bound -30.25 East bound 153.15 West bound 141.0 South bound -39.25
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Product Type/Sub Type

dataset - External Publication - Scientific Journal Paper

Constraints

license
Non-Exclusive licence to publish copyright (please provide TRIM link)

Author(s)

Date (publication)

2002

Product Type

dataset

Topic Category

geoscientificInformation

Keywords

External Publication
Scientific Journal Paper
Earth Sciences

Resource Language

English

Resource Character Set

utf8

Resource Security Classification

unclassified

Geographic Extent

North bound
-30.25
East bound
153.15
West bound
141.0
South bound
-39.25

Lineage

Unknown

Digital Transfer Options

onLine

Distributor

Role
distributor
Organisation Name
Geoscience Australia
City
Canberra
Administrative Area
ACT
Postal Code
2601
Country
Australia
Email Address

Metadata File Identifier

a05f7892-fa43-7506-e044-00144fdd4fa6

Metadata Standard Name

ANZLIC Metadata Profile: An Australian/New Zealand Profile of AS/NZS ISO 19115:2005, Geographic information - Metadata

Metadata Standard Version

1.1

Metadata Date Stamp

2010-10-25

METADATA SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

unclassified

Metadata Contact

Role
pointOfContact
Organisation Name
Geoscience Australia
City
Canberra
Administrative Area
ACT
Postal Code
2601
Country
Australia
Email Address
This product is not available for download due to licence restrictions.

For more information, please contact the Geoscience Australia Sales Centre via:

fax:
+61 2 6249 9960; or
phone:
1800 800 173 (within Australia);
 
+61 2 6249 9966 (outside Australia).

Please note that support hours are 9 am to 5 pm weekdays