Citation

Geoscience Australia provides most of its products for free under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence. We only require that you reference the use of our data or information using the following citation:
Southgate, P.N. & Shergold, J.H., 1991. Application of sequence stratigraphic concepts to Middle Cambrian phosphogenesis, Georgina Basin, Australia. BMR Journal of Australian Geology and Geophysics  12:2:119-144. Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics, Canberra.

Abstract

The stratigraphic and spatial distributions of phosphatic and organic-matter rich Middle Cambrian sediments of the Georgina Basin are outlined in terms of sequence stratigraphic concepts. This approach has permitted an integrated analysis of Middle Cambrian depositional patterns and their time constraints. It has also provided insights into aspects of the basins structure, the timing of subsidence of its primary Components, and frequency of relative sea level fluctuations. Middle to early Late Cambrian sediments of the Georgina Basin are interpreted to occur in two stratigraphic sequences. In each sequence phosphorites, phosphatic limestones and organic-matter rich shales comprise a suite of repeating lithofacies restricted to retrogradational parasequence sets of the transgressive systems tract. The position of facies within each transgressive systems tract depends on relative sea level, palaeogeography and palaeotectonics. In sequence 1 (early Middle Cambrian), phosphogenesis is related to gradual transgression of a continent with irregular palaeotopography. Sequence 1a is interpreted to be of local significance, related to early subsidence of the Mt Isa Block during the late Ordian to early Templetonian. A rapid fall in relative sea level terminated sediment accumulation in sequence 1 and led to the development of a subaerial exposure surface. Sediments of the transgressive systems tract in stratigraphic sequence 2 are of lateTempletonian to early Undillan age. Deposition in sequence2 ceased in the Mindyallan. Rocks of the transgressive systemstract occur in three retrogradational parasequence sets. Recognition of sequence boundaries has helped clarify lateralbiofacies, leading to improved reconstructions of thepalaeogeographic distribution of the phosphorites and organic-matter rich shales.
Google map showing geographic bounding box with values North bound -15.32 East bound 140.51 West bound 133.21 South bound -24.48
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Product Type/Sub Type

nonGeographicDataset - GA Publication - Journal

Constraints

license
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence

IP Owner

Commonwealth of Australia (Geoscience Australia)

Author(s)

Date (publication)

1991

Product Type

nonGeographicDataset

Topic Category

geoscientificInformation

Keywords

GA Publication
Journal
Earth Sciences

Resource Language

English

Resource Character Set

utf8

Resource Security Classification

unclassified

Geographic Extent

North bound
-15.32
East bound
140.51
West bound
133.21
South bound
-24.48

Lineage

Unknown

Digital Transfer Options

onLine

DISTRIBUTION Format

pdf

Distributor

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distributor
Organisation Name
Geoscience Australia
City
Canberra
Administrative Area
ACT
Postal Code
2601
Country
Australia
Email Address

Metadata File Identifier

fae9173a-70e3-71e4-e044-00144fdd4fa6

Metadata Standard Name

ANZLIC Metadata Profile: An Australian/New Zealand Profile of AS/NZS ISO 19115:2005, Geographic information - Metadata

Metadata Standard Version

1.1

Metadata Date Stamp

2014-06-23

METADATA SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

unclassified

Metadata Contact

Role
pointOfContact
Organisation Name
Geoscience Australia
City
Canberra
Administrative Area
ACT
Postal Code
2601
Country
Australia
Email Address
Downloads
For information on acquiring this product,
please contact Geoscience Australia Client Services via:

fax:
+61 2 6249 9960; or
phone:
1800 800 173 (within Australia);
 
+61 2 6249 9966 (outside Australia).