GovHack 2017

GovHack webpage banner

Geoscience Australia is proud to support the 2017 GovHack competition, which will take place from 28-30 July 2017. As an Australian Government agency, we support our data being used for great real-world outcomes and helping people to engage in, understand and use scientific information in their everyday lives.

As the national geoscience agency, Geoscience Australia provides stewardship of a vast range of geoscientific and geographic data that supports the management of Australia's precious water resources, hazard modelling for safer communities, exploration for mineral and petroleum resources, as well as helping to manage Australia's maritime jurisdictions.

Contacts during GovHack

Geoscience Australia mentors can be contacted in the lead-up to and during GovHack via:

@Geo­AusData Twitter account

An official Geoscience Australia Twitter account providing Open Data access to the extensive range of Gesocience Australia data, publications, online tools, web services and maps. A first point of contact for our mentors during GovHack.

GovHack 2017 Hackerspace

Hackerspace is the Official GovHack competition submission site and allows you to submit all components required for your team’s Govhack entry.

2017 GovHack mentors page

Each year GovHack is supported by an awesome group of mentors who volunteer to provide assistance to teams with their areas of expertise.

#talk-geoscience_au via GovHack Slack

Interested hackers can join the #talk-geoscience_au channel via the GovHack Slack and ask questions. A data access mentor will be monitoring the channel at all times. If a science based question comes up they can pass it on to the relevant mentor.

Useful datasets

Geoscience Australia is committed to providing open access to all its datasets, which are available to explore via Geoscience Australia's Data and Publications Search.

We're excited to see what can be done with our datasets for GovHack 2017, and have identified two in particular as featured datasets. These are the Australian historic earthquakes and the Great Artesian Basin groundwater and geochemical datasets. Refer to the tabs on this webpage for further details on these datasets.

Further information

When it comes to earthquakes, living in Australia is much safer relative to other parts of the world. Australia is well away from tectonic plate boundaries where most of the world’s earthquakes occur, but we still experience the occasional rumble from time-to-time.

Agency / Department

Geoscience Australia

Data Set Title

Earthquake Mapping Tool

Description

Over the past two decades the world has seen a number of earthquakes affect large sections of the world’s population, bringing devastation to cities and causing tsunami in the Pacific and Indian Oceans.
These large geological events occur at the boundaries of the Earth’s tectonic plates which are continuously moving relative to each other). Effects of these dynamic processes can be felt regularly in countries such as neighbouring New Zealand, Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea, Japan, the Americas, and Indonesia, as they lie on plate boundaries surrounding the Pacific Ocean - this region is known as the ‘ring of fire’.
Fortunately the Australian continent sits in the middle of the Indo-Australian tectonic plate, making us much less likely to experience the large, destructive earthquakes than the countries listed above. However, we still need to understand the history of earthquakes in Australia and their associated risk to make sure our building codes and emergency response plans are adequate.
The earthquake mapping tool provides extremal access to Geoscience Australia’s internal EARTHMON database. Users can use the search tool to extract earthquake data based on date, location, depth, magnitude and significance.

  • What further uses can you find for this data?
  • Can you show all recorded Australian earthquakes through time?
  • Can you combine the dataset with satellite imagery to show the before and after of larger earthquake events?
  • How useful can social media be in mapping when people feel earthquakes?

File Format(s)

CSV, KML, XLS

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence.

Data Location (online)

http://www.ga.gov.au/earthquakes/searchQuake.do

Geospatial Coverage

International extent. Data focuses on Australia and surrounding regions.

Temporal Coverage

01/12/1955 - Present

Data Status
(Active/Historical)

Active

Data Documentation (online)

Existing Data and Reports:

Additional resources:

Competition or General

Either

Groundwater resources support urban and rural communities around Australia. A wide variety of agricultural enterprises and other industries also use vast amounts of groundwater. For many regional areas, particularly in arid and semi-arid Australia, it is often the only reliable source of water to support communities and economic activity.

Agency/ Department

Geoscience Australia

Data Set Title

Digital datasets from the Great Artesian Basin Atlas

Description

The Great Artesian Basin (GAB) is one of Australia's most significant hydrogeological entities covering more than 1.7 million square kilometres, underlying parts of Queensland, New South Wales, South Australia and the Northern Territory. The GAB contains a vast volume of underground water (estimated at 64,900 million megalitres) and is the largest groundwater basin in Australia. Groundwater resources in the GAB are used to support the pastoral, agricultural, and resource sectors as well as supplying water to inland communities. Properly managing these groundwater resources, often for competing interests, requires an understanding of how the groundwater system works at a regional scale.
The Hydrogeological Atlas of the Great Artesian Basin presents a compilation of maps documenting some of the key regional geological, hydrogeological and hydrochemical aspects of the GAB. It provides insights into the current understanding of the regional geometry and physical characteristics of the rocks and water contained within this vast groundwater basin and baseline information against which future changes can be assessed.
The digital datasets from the GAB Atlas are the shapefiles from which the atlas was produced. These can be subsetted, manipulated, combined with external datasets, or recombined in interesting ways.

File Format(s)

This featured dataset is a collection of 45 datasets of the GAB. The vast majority of these are provided in shapefiles, while some are provided as ArcGIS-grids, ts video files, and ESRI asci files.

Licence

Data is available under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Licence

Data Location (online)

The digital datasets for the GAB Atlas can be accessed via the Geoscience Australia website. Each dataset links to its own catalog item, with metadata and download link.

Geospatial Coverage

North bound
-9.01
East bound
153.18
West bound
132.07
South bound
-33.69

Temporal Coverage

N/A

Data Status
(Active/Historical)

Historical

Data Documentation (online)

Existing Data and Reports from the GAB Atlas:

Additional resources:

Competition or General

Either