Earthquakes - the Australian experience

14 October 2015

Geoscience Australia Duty Seismologist Emma Mathews monitors earthquakes in the Earthquake Alert Centre which forms part of the Joint Australian Tsunami Warning Centre.

Geoscience Australia Duty
Seismologist Emma Mathews
monitors earthquakes in the
Earthquake Alert Centre which
forms part of the Joint
Australian Tsunami Warning Centre.

Geoscience Australia monitors, analyses and reports on significant earthquakes to alert emergency managers, government and the public about earthquakes in Australia and overseas.

Most of Australia's earthquakes are relatively small, caused by the sudden release of stress that slowly builds up across the Australian tectonic plate as it moves northeast about 7cm per year. However, the Australian continent can still experience potentially damaging earthquakes, such as the magnitude 6.7 Meckering earthquake in October 1968 or the magnitude 5.7 Newcastle earthquake in December 1989.

This talk will outline Geoscience Australia's role in providing a 24/7 earthquake monitoring and alerting service in our region; and as part of the Joint Australian Tsunami Warning Centre in collaboration with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology.

Emma Mathews joined Geoscience Australia in 2004 after graduating from the University of Tasmania with a BSc. (Hons.) in Geology. Emma has worked in a variety of roles across the agency, including mapping seabed sediments, analysing and interpreting igneous geochemistry, and synthesising Eastern Australia's Phanerozoic rocks. Her most recent role is as a Duty Seismologist in the Earthquake Alert and Tsunami Warning Section.

This seminar is presented as part of the Geoscience Australia Wednesday Seminar series and Earth Science Week 2015.

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Date: 14 October 2015
Time: 11.00am AEDT
Location: Sir Harold Raggatt Theatre, Geoscience Australia
Cost/bookings: Free, no bookings required
Audience: Non-technical, Earthquakes, Disaster Preparedness
More information: talks@ga.gov.au