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Australian Topography Map Service

The Australian Topographic map service is seamless national dataset coverage for the whole of Australia. The map portrays detailed graphic representation of features that appear on the Earth's surface. These features include cultural, hydrography and relief themes. SS, MS and LS refer to Small, Medium and Large Scale datasets.

Scanned 250K Geological Maps Index (WMS)

This Web Map Service displays the spatial extents of scanned images of all 1:250 000 scale geological maps of Australia. The service contains information on the edition, publication date, and map publisher, and has links to map images available as 75 DPI, 125 DPI or 250 DPI resolution JPG files.

Scanned 250K Geological Maps Index ESRI Mapserver

This Web Map Service displays the spatial extents of scanned images of all 1:250 000 scale geological maps of Australia. The service contains information on the edition, publication date, and map publisher, and has links to map images available as 75 DPI, 125 DPI or 250 DPI resolution JPG files.

Scanned 250K Geological Maps (web application)

View or download scanned images of all 1:250 000 scale geology maps of Australia. Images are available in 75 DPI, 125 DPI or 250 DPI resolution JPG files. The images are not spatially georeferenced. This application is deliverd on the Geoscience Portal (www.geoscience.gov.au), a collaborative web portal maintained by Geoscience Australia on behalf of all Australian State, Territory and Commonwealth geological survey agencies.

Australian Geological Provinces (2013.01 edition) Web Map Service

The Australian Geological Provinces Database contains descriptions and spatial extents of the fundamental geological elements of the Australian continent and offshore surrounds. Province types include sedimentary basins, tectonic provinces such as cratons and orogens, igneous provinces, and metallogenic provinces. Spatial data has been captured largely at approximately 1:1M scale for intended use between 1:2M and 1:5M scale. This edition (2013.01) of the dataset is not a complete representation of all of Australia's geological provinces. Further work is required to complete the national geological province collection. Additionally, not all the provinces supplied herein have undergone a rigorous quality assurance (QA) check to ensure the accuracy and completeness of their descriptions. The geological definition of some provinces is contentious. While every effort has been made to achieve a consensus interpretation of each province, including significant collaboration with state and territory geological surveys, scientific debate may still occur about the nature and extent of some provinces. The full 2D spatial extent (ie, including the extent of a province under any overlying cover material) of provinces has been captured. Where possible, the full extent outlines (contacts) of provinces have been attributed with information about the source, accuracy, and observation method of those lines.

Australian Geological Provinces (2013.01 edition) ESRI MapServer

The Australian Geological Provinces Database contains descriptions and spatial extents of the fundamental geological elements of the Australian continent and offshore surrounds. Province types include sedimentary basins, tectonic provinces such as cratons and orogens, igneous provinces, and metallogenic provinces. Spatial data has been captured largely at approximately 1:1M scale for intended use between 1:2M and 1:5M scale. This edition (2013.01) of the dataset is not a complete representation of all of Australia's geological provinces. Further work is required to complete the national geological province collection. Additionally, not all the provinces supplied herein have undergone a rigorous quality assurance (QA) check to ensure the accuracy and completeness of their descriptions. The geological definition of some provinces is contentious. While every effort has been made to achieve a consensus interpretation of each province, including significant collaboration with state and territory geological surveys, scientific debate may still occur about the nature and extent of some provinces. The full 2D spatial extent (ie, including the extent of a province under any overlying cover material) of provinces has been captured. Where possible, the full extent outlines (contacts) of provinces have been attributed with information about the source, accuracy, and observation method of those lines.

Australian Mines and Mineral Deposit Map, June 2005

Australian Mines and Mineral Deposit Map, 1:5 000 000, June 2005 Version

Australian Mines and Mineral Deposit Map, December 2004

Australian Mines and Mineral Deposit Map, 1:10 000 000, December 2004 Version

Australian Offshore Mineral Locations Map, August 2006

The Australian Offshore Mineral Locations map shows mineral occurrences and deposits within Australia's 200 nautical mile exclusive economic zone and extended continental shelf. Australia will have one of the largest marine jurisdictions in the world (14.4 million square kilometres) if the United Nations Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf agrees to Australia's submission on the outer limit of its extended continental shelf. This is greater than Australia's total land area (13.6 million square kilometres), including Antarctica. The Offshore Mineral Locations map sheds light on the mineral prospectivity in this exciting, but poorly known frontier. It should serve also to ensure mineral values are considered in marine planning and decision making. The Australian Offshore Mineral Locations map draws together data from published and unpublished marine research surveys as well as reports from federal and state government records. Mineral locations shown include manganese nodules and crusts, shellsand, construction aggregate, heavy mineral sand, phosphorites, diamonds, tin, copper, gold and coal. Types of mineralisation, some interpreted from limited information, provide an insight into the nature of the depositional settings. Bathymetry shows the variable physiography of the seafloor that surrounds Australia. For the first time it is possible to identify features such as the contextual setting of manganese crusts and nodules on the East Tasman Plateau and South Tasman Rise, and shellsand and cobalt crust on the edge of the Ceduna Terrace where it descends to the South Australian Abyssal Plain. Insets and images on the map show further detail, mineral specimens and operational aspects associated with exploration and recovery of marine minerals. The map is the result of a collaborative project between Geoscience Australia, CSIRO's Wealth from Oceans Flagship and Division of Exploration and Mining, and each of the State and Northern Territory Geological Surveys. The Australian Offshore Mineral Locations data can be viewed online by using Geoscience Australia's Australian Marine Spatial Information System (AMSIS). AMSIS contains more than 80 layers of Australian marine information which can be viewed and integrated with mineral locations data to create maps to meet specific requirements.

Australian Mineral Mines Map, January 2007

This map shows operating mines and deposits where development has commenced or a decision to mine has been announced. It illustrates the geographic distribution of mines and the range of commodities mined.