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Surface Geology of Australia Map Service

The Surface Geology of Australia Map Service provides two seamless national data sets of bedrock and surficial geology, compiled for use at 1:1 million scale and 1:2.5 million scale. , The data sets were released in 2012. It also contains 1:5M data for geological regions and metamorphic geology. , The 1:1M data is limited so that it does not display at scales less than 1:1, 500, 000. The 1:2.5M data is limited so that it does not display at scales greater than 1:1, 500, 000. , The data represents outcropping or near-outcropping bedrock units, and unconsolidated or poorly consolidated regolith material covering bedrock. , Geological units are represented as polygon and line geometries, and are attributed with information regarding stratigraphic name and hierarchy, age, lithology, and primary data source. , Layers are available for geological units coloured by lithostratigraphy, age, and lithology. The dataset also contains geological contacts, structural features such as faults and shears , and miscellaneous supporting lines like the boundaries of water and ice bodies. Copyright Commonwealth of Australia (Geoscience Australia) 2013. , This material is released free under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/

Crustal Elements of Australia Map Service

This map service was created to replace the GA National Geoscience Datasets service: to that end it should be used in conjunction with other GA map services. , The Australian Crustal Elements dataset delineates upper crustal elements, primarily based on composite geophysical domains, each of which shows a distinctive pattern of magnetic and gravity anomalies. , These elements generally relate to the basement, rather than the sedimentary basins. Boundaries between these elements are interpreted to mark crustal-scale changes in composition or structural pattern, or both. , Where feasible, these boundaries are chosen to emphasise their correlation with the outcropping boundaries of geological provinces

Surface Geology of Australia Cached Map Service (Web Mercator)

The Surface Geology of Australia Map Service provides two seamless national data sets of bedrock and surficial geology, compiled for use at 1:1 million scale and 1:2.5 million scale. The data sets were released in 2012. The 1:1M data is limited so that it does not display at scales less than 1:1, 500, 000. The 1:2.5M data is limited so that it does not display at scales greater than 1:1, 500, 000. The data represents outcropping or near-outcropping bedrock units, and unconsolidated or poorly consolidated regolith material covering bedrock. Geological units are represented as polygon and line geometries, and are attributed with information regarding stratigraphic name and hierarchy, age, lithology, and primary data source. Layers are available for geological units coloured by lithostratigraphy, age, and lithology. The dataset also contains geological contacts, structural features such as faults and shears, and miscellaneous supporting lines like the boundaries of water and ice bodies. Copyright Commonwealth of Australia (Geoscience Australia) 2012. This material is released free under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/

Surface Geology of Australia (1:1M scale dataset) A3 map

This map was created from the Surface Geology of Australia (1:1M scale) dataset, plotted at 1:15 million scale. The Surface Geology of Australia data was compiled by standardising and edge-matching over 400 geological maps which have been published by Australian Government, State and Territory agencies over the past 40 years. This seamless digital dataset is the most detailed national coverage available of the continent and islands. It provides information on the distribution and type of over 5000 outcropping bedrock and regolith units, such as sand plains and dunes.

Surface Geology of Australia WMS

The Surface Geology of Australia Web Map Service provides two seamless national coverages of bedrock and surficial geology, compiled for use at 1:1 million scale and 1:2.5 million scale. The data sets were released in 2012. , It also contains 1:5M data for geological regions and metamorphic geology. , The 1:1M data is limited so that it does not display at scales less than 1:1, 500, 000. The 1:2.5M data is limited so that it does not display at scales greater than 1:1, 500, 000. , The data represents outcropping or near-outcropping bedrock units, and unconsolidated or poorly consolidated regolith material covering bedrock. , Geological units are represented as polygon and line geometries, and are attributed with information regarding stratigraphic name and hierarchy, age, lithology, and primary data source. , Layers are available for geological units coloured by lithostratigraphy, age, and lithology. The dataset also contains geological contacts, structural features such as faults and shears , and miscellaneous supporting lines like the boundaries of water and ice bodies. Copyright Commonwealth of Australia (Geoscience Australia) 2013. , This material is released free under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/

Uranium content of igneous rocks of Australia. Map 2 Average uranium abundance: surface geology

Igneous rocks have long been recognised as an important source of metals in uranium mineral systems. Although magmas may form mineral deposits in their own right, they may also contribute directly to basin-related mineral systems as a source of metals and/or ligands. Thus, mapping of the distribution of uranium in igneous rocks has the potential to highlight potentially prospective regions for uranium mineralisation at a macro-scale. Map 2 in the series of three maps of the uranium content of Australian igneous rocks shows polygons of igneous rock distribution, derived from the Geoscience Australia 1:1,000,000 national surface geology dataset. Polygons are coloured by their average uranium content. The average uranium content of each polygon was calculated by plotting the igneous polygons together with geochemical sample points (distribution shown in Map 1 of the series) using ArcGIS software. Each polygon was then attributed with the average uranium value (in ppm) of all intersecting geochemical sample points. This approach allows igneous uranium content to be assessed on the pluton- to province-scale, depending on polygon resolution. Together with the two other maps in the series, this map demonstrates the close spatial relationship between uranium-rich igneous rocks and areas of known uranium mineralisation. In addition, new regions previously unknown for uranium mineralisation can be identified.

Uranium content of igneous rocks of Australia. Map 1. Igneous rock type: surface geology

Igneous rocks have long been recognised as an important source of metals in uranium mineral systems. Although magmas may form mineral deposits in their own right, they may also contribute directly to basin-related mineral systems as a source of metals and/or ligands. Thus, mapping of the distribution of uranium in igneous rocks has the potential to highlight potentially prospective regions for uranium mineralisation at a macro-scale. This map is the first in a series of three showing the uranium content of Australian igneous rocks. Map 1 shows the individual geochemical data points compiled for this study. Points are coloured and sized based on their uranium content. Igneous rock types from Geoscience Australia's 1:1,000,000 national surface geology dataset are also shown in the background. Geochemical analyses from igneous rock types spanning all compositions have been utilised, despite the low total abundance of uranium in ultramafic, mafic and intermediate compositions. Together with the two other maps in the series, this map demonstrates the close spatial relationship between uranium-rich igneous rocks and areas of known uranium mineralisation. In addition, new regions previously unknown for uranium mineralisation can be identified.

Guide to Using the Australian Crustal Elements Map

Legacy product - no abstract available

Australian Crustal Elements (National Geoscience Dataset)

The Australian Crustal Elements dataset delineates upper crustal elements, primarily based on composite geophysical domains, each of which shows a distinctive pattern of magnetic and gravity anomalies. These elements generally relate to the basement, rather than the sedimentary basins. Boundaries between these elements are interpreted to mark crustal-scale changes in composition or structural pattern, or both. Where feasible, these boundaries are chosen to emphasise their correlation with the outcropping boundaries of geological provinces.

Australia crustal elements map based on the distribution of geophysical domains

Australia crustal elements map based on the distribution of geophysical domains